Dueling rallies in Washington over Dobbs case

While the Dobbs case was being argued at the U.S. Supreme Court on December 1, two rallies were taking place outside. I went to Washington for the day in order to stand with the people calling on the Court to overturn Roe v. Wade and its cousin Planned Parenthood v. Casey.

Dobbs is about a Mississippi law setting a 15-week limit on abortions. May a state regulate abortion before viability? The Supreme Court might say yes or no. It might use the case to overrule Roe, or it might make a narrow ruling that OKs the Mississippi law while somehow keeping Roe and Casey in place. We’ll find out by the end of next June.

There were about two thousand people standing in front of the Supreme Court building on December 1, roughly evenly divided between pro-life and pro-Roe. A crowd-control fence divided the two groups, although there was plenty of peaceful passage back and forth. Capitol Police kept an eye on things.

It was a noisy gathering. Each side had about three hours worth of speakers, with mics and loudspeakers. There were chants and songs and shouts. Despite the sound system, I couldn’t make out many words on either side because of the ambient noise. Anyone following the live-streamed rallies remotely probably heard more speakers than I did.

It was worth listening later to a recording of Kathryn Jean Lopez’s speech. I recommend it. https://youtu.be/4ymvmIiaiO8

I met up with a group from Feminists for Life to pick up a sign. Just about every other pro-life group I’ve ever heard of, plus a few I hadn’t, was represented in the crowd. The diversity was great, as though speakers at the side rallies at the annual March for Life had been suddenly handed the keys to the main stage. The only thing we all had in common was a determination to move past Roe.

placard saying "Peace begins in the womb"
The sign I carried outside the Supreme Court, courtesy of Feminists for Life: Peace begins in the womb.

U.S. Supreme Court to hear challenge to Roe on December 1

The state of Mississippi enacted a law in 2018 restricting abortion after 15 weeks’ gestation. It was challenged in court (of course). The case, called Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, has reached the U.S. Supreme Court. Oral arguments are scheduled for December 1, with a decision to be handed down in 2022. The Court will be asked to rule on whether states may enact any pre-viability abortion restrictions.

This gives the Court a chance to overrule Roe and Casey. It also gives the Court a chance to affirm them.

For all the recent agitation that has accompanied the nomination and confirmation of Supreme Court Justices, no one knows how Dobbs will come out.

I’ll be traveling to Washington, DC on December 1 to stand outside the Supreme Court beside pro-life activists from around the country urging the Justices to let the Mississippi law stand. Discount airfare, one-day trip, pack a lunch: no sweat. For me, it’ll be like the March for Life seven weeks early.

For those staying closer to home, a coalition of Christian groups is organizing an online prayer event to be held on November 18 at 8 p.m. Eastern time. From the event’s invitation:

Join Catholic, Orthodox, and Protestant Christians across the country coming together online to pray for the Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization case. This is the case that could could overturn Roe v. Wade—the Supreme Court decision that made abortion legal in all 50 states. This historic online gathering will bring together Christians across denominations. Together, we will pray for a just outcome that protects millions of preborn babies and their mothers. Jesus says, “where two or three are gathered together in my name, there am I in the midst of them” (Mt 18:20). Join us!

Find the flyer for the November event at prayfordobbs.com. There’s also a printable information sheet about the Dobbs case. Share freely.

One needn’t be Christian to recognize the right to life, and groups like Secular Pro-Life are supporting the Mississippi law. There’s room for everyone to urge the Court to move past Roe.

Tickets now available to stream “Roe v. Wade” film

From my inbox comes this announcement of a special online event, courtesy of WICX radio in Concord. “Roe v. Wade” is a new film drama about the 1973 Supreme Court case that legalized abortion nationwide. Tickets are available for a limited time at a discount from the full price, which will go into effect when the film gets a wider release in April. Read on for ticket information.

From the WICX announcement:

Would you like to help support pro-life efforts, learn things that you might not have known, and enjoy a new star-studded movie at a discounted ticket price?  WICX 102.7 Hope FM in Concord is hosting an online screening of the movie “Roe v. Wade” during March 2021.  

The film tells the story of events leading up to the 1973 Supreme Court case that legalized abortion in the United States.  It is a story that affects all of us.  You can watch the trailer here: Roe v Wade Trailer (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HUkEpm8kPyQ&t=2s).

Buy a ticket for your online screening now!  Click here: Buy a Ticket (https://www.watchroevwade.com/nhrtlwicx). That discounted ticket will give you a 30-day window to complete your private screening before the movie’s April release date. [Note: the ticket costs $14.24, which includes the processing fee.]

Be a pro-life advocate, support this important cause, and spread the word about the online screening event to everyone!

 Note:  Please keep in mind that the film is rated PG-13 and might not be appropriate for younger viewers.

For Life,

Mike Bellino, WICX 102.7 Hope FM, General Manager

Shaheen: “We won’t go back”

U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D-New Hampshire) sends out occasional email updates to anyone who cares to subscribe. They are as smooth and polished as you’d expect from a savvy, experienced politician. Her most recent one, released close to the anniversary of Roe v. Wade, included a celebration of abortion, tucked in below a few other news items.

As you read this, bear in mind that then-Gov. Shaheen in 1997 signed the law that stripped New Hampshire statutes of 19th-century abortion laws, replacing them with nothing. She made New Hampshire Gosnell-friendly before we’d ever heard of him.

Bear in mind as well that Sen. Shaheen is running this year for her third term representing New Hampshire in the United States Senate.

Here’s a screenshot of the relevant portion of the January 2020 update, with text below in case the image fails to load. The photo in the screenshot is from the original email.

From Sen. Shaheen email to constituents, January 2020

Senator Shaheen’s words, from that screenshot:

This week marked the 47th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade decision, a landmark case that determined legal and constitutional safeguards for what many of us already morally believed to be true: women’s reproductive health care decisions belong to them, not their government.

Roe has had a dramatic impact over the past 47 years. The Supreme Court decision ushered in a new era for women’s health, reducing the number of dangerous back alley abortions and expanding access to family planning services and contraceptives, which have helped reduce abortion rates to historic lows.

As we look back on decades of progress, we do so knowing that the rights secured by Roe v. Wade have never been more in danger since the decision was first handed down. Republican efforts to overturn Roe, restrictive state laws that seek to shut down abortion clinics, and the Trump administration’s incessant attacks on family planning programs continue to put women’s health at stake.

“I’m inspired by the groundswell of activism by women and girls of all ages in response to these attacks on women’s health, and I believe that together we can fight off these efforts and keep pushing forward. We stand on the shoulders of generations of women who fought to get us here. We can’t go back. We won’t go back.”

I was struck as I read Sen. Shaheen’s message by how much I agree with that last paragraph. Fresh off my trip to the March for Life in Washington, I too am inspired by the groundswell of activism by women and girls of all ages – in response to attacks on human dignity and the right to life, that is. I agree that we can keep pushing forward. I stand on the shoulders of women who fought to get the pro-life movement this far. I won’t go back.

N.H. Abortion Law: Even the Pros are Astounded

Just when I think I’m beyond surprise, this happens.

A reader of this blog who was taken aback at my post about New Hampshire’s lack of abortion regulation decided to write an op-ed column on the topic for her local newspaper. That’s usually a routine process for her. She’s active in her community, and she knows the editor. This time, the editor got back to her and asked for documentation.

In particular, he sought documentation of this fact: New Hampshire allows abortion on demand through all nine months of pregnancy. “Do you have the RSA so I can link the law? There should be a state law that allows…late term abortions.”

That question came from a professional journalist working in New Hampshire.

I checked his profile on LinkedIn. He has worked in this area for many years. He was around when Jeanne Shaheen signed repeal of New Hampshire’s abortion laws. He was in college when Roe v. Wade was handed down. He is a prizewinning editor. He’s a pro.

And he has no idea that late-term abortions are the default setting in the United States. Unless a state has a law placing a time limit on abortion, there is no limit. He also apparently doesn’t know that New Hampshire legislators have repeatedly refused to impose a limit, most recently last year.

The op-ed writer can’t show a New Hampshire law “allowing” late-term abortions because there isn’t one. None is needed in order for unlimited abortion to be legal. Roe v. Wade permits states to assert an interest in protecting the preborn child at the point of viability, but it does not require states to do so.

New Hampshire lawmakers have chosen not to assert that interest.

Whether the reader’s op-ed makes it into print is between her and the editor. I hope it gets published. The editor’s initial reluctance to move ahead with it isn’t a matter of pro-abortion bias.

He honestly can’t believe our state’s situation – not yet, anyway. New Hampshire law allows abortion throughout pregnancy, because New Hampshire law imposes no time limit.

If you think that goes without saying, think again.

Update: within a few days of the initial submission of the op-ed, the editor chose to print it.