Enduring work: two ministries going strong

Part of a series marking the tenth anniversary of the Leaven for the Loaf blog.

A pair of ambitious pro-life projects launched within weeks of this blog’s first post. I heralded both of them as promising efforts. Where are they ten years later?

Still in business, going strong.

And Then There Were None

A former abortion worker herself, Abby Johnson recognized the practical, legal, emotional, and spiritual assistance a person needs in order to leave the abortion industry. In June 2012, she announced the creation of a nonprofit organization called And Then There Were None (ATTWN) to provide those services.

Today, ten years later, ATTWN has helped more than six hundred abortion workers who chose to leave their jobs – “quitters,” as they call themselves. Some have shared their stories on the ATTWN website, abortionworker.com.

The site highlights a few metrics that raise red flags about the industry’s treatment of workers: 33% of the “quitters” report that they didn’t have the necessary certification or qualifications to perform a task they were assigned; 18% were told to perform something illegal; 18% have attempted suicide. Yet even under such stress, a person who relies on abortion-industry employment in order to support a family can feel stuck. ATTWN offers resources that can open up options.

I interviewed a couple of ATTWN workers a few years ago, and I asked them about their approach to abortion workers: “we love them out,” they told me.

See abortionworker.com to learn more about ATTWN.

Charlotte Lozier Institute

Before the Charlotte Lozier Institute was founded, no single pro-life organization was dedicated to the kind of research on which policymakers could rely. Today, with a large staff of employees and an impressive roster of scholars, CLI sponsors and promotes research on a broad range of life issues and healthcare policy.

Once upon a time, the Guttmacher Institute – a onetime Planned Parenthood project – was the only place where journalists, activists, and legislators could find facts and figures about abortion. That’s no longer the case.

From CLI’s website: “The Charlotte Lozier Institute is committed to bringing the power of science, medicine, and research to bear in life-related policy making, media, and debates  to promote a culture and polity of life. In just over a decade, CLI has established itself as a go-to source for accurate and timely research and information on life issues. With a current network of nearly seventy Associate Scholars from a variety of disciplines, CLI provides pro-life groups and policy makers research-based information of the highest quality on issues including abortion, women’s health, prenatal diagnosis and treatment for the unborn, perinatal hospice, abortion reporting, sex-selection abortion, stem cell research and medicine, and health care policy.”

Go to lozierinstitute.org to check out some of CLI’s published research. Make sure your legislators know about this resource as they consider promoting pro-life policy.

Post featured image: pexels.com

2021 legislation coming into focus

The New Hampshire State House remains closed to the public, but legislative business is underway with live-streamed sessions and Zoom hearings. Proposed legislation includes several life-issue and conscience-rights bills that are awaiting scheduling.

I should illustrate this post with a photo of a laptop screen instead of the State House. The screen is as close as we’ll get to the committees, until someone in COVID-19 authority declares otherwise.

Here’s a partial list of bills, with legislation still being developed. Hearings are not yet scheduled for these measures.

Continue reading “2021 legislation coming into focus”

State House 2020 Preview

New Hampshire legislators have filed legislative service requests for 2020, indicating the kinds of bills we’re likely to see when House and Senate convene in January. To date, 795 LSRs are on record, and more may be on the way.

Among the proposals:

  • Born-alive legislation, to ensure that children who survive attempted abortion are given appropriate medical support.
  • “Prohibiting abortion in certain cases”: LSRs can be very vague, sometimes intentionally so, with clarity and precise language coming only when the bill based on the LSR is finally released. The sponsors on this one look encouraging in any case.
  • A heartbeat bill. Iowa passed a heartbeat bill in 2018 that was struck down as unconstitutional earlier this year. Whether NH’s proposal is identical remains to be seen.

Then there’s LSR 2600, which should be setting off alarms:

“[R]elating to reproductive medical decisions. Providing that the state shall not infringe or unduly inconvenience the right of reproductive medical decisions.”

That’s not a proposed bill. It’s a proposed amendment to the New Hampshire Constitution. Sponsors thus far: Reps. Timothy Smith, Timothy Harrigan, Catherine Sofikitis, Sherry Frost, Chuck Grassie, Heidi Hamer, and Arthur Ellison.

I’ve been concerned that the privacy amendment recently added to the state constitution might be misinterpreted to protect the abortion industry. That’s nothing compared to this proposed amendment, which would embed abortion unambiguously into New Hampshire’s constitution in the guise of “reproductive medical decisions.”

The texts of bills should be available next month, with hearings beginning in January.

State senate primaries 2016: Districts 1, 2, 8

Part one of a review of state senate primaries

The 2016 primary election in New Hampshire will be Tuesday, September 13. You can obtain a sample ballot from your town clerk or from the Secretary of State’s web site under “Election Information.”

Of the 24 state senate races, nine have primary contests in one or both parties. I haven’t surveyed or interviewed the candidates, but there are voting records available for those who are incumbents or who have held office before. Here’s a look at state senate primary races, with voting records on some life-issue bills I’ve followed in the 2015-2016 session. If one of your local candidates has no record to go by, it’s time for you to reach out with friendly questions. September 13 is coming up quickly.

Find selected 2016 life-issue votes at this link. 

Find selected 2015 life-issue votes at this link.

I am counting on New Hampshire readers to let me know if there are candidates I have mistakenly listed as not having held state office before. I’ll make corrections as needed.

District 1:  There is a Republican primary between Rep. Leon Rideout and Dolly McPhaul. The incumbent senator, Jeff Woodburn, is unchallenged on the Democratic side. McPhaul has no voting record on the life issues of which I’m aware.

Rideout has been a leader on fetal homicide legislation. (For more about Griffin’s Law and other fetal homicide bills, see this page with links to coverage of hearings.) He has a pro-life voting record. Look for his results at the links above, under Coos County district 7.

District 2:  There is a Republican primary between Rep. Brian Gallagher and former Rep. Bob Giuda. Both have pro-life voting records. Gallagher has a very strong pro-life voting record over the past two years for Belknap County district 4 (see links above).

Giuda served in the House from 2001 to 2006, and during that time he supported parental notification for minors seeking abortion (voting against an “inexpedient to legislate” motion on HB 1380, 2/15/02; and then voting “ought to pass” on HB 763, 3/25/03); he supported a partial-birth abortion ban (voting against an “inexpedient to legislate” motion on HB 1220, 3/17/04); he opposed public funding of abortion (voting against an “inexpedient to legislate” motion on HB 1253, 2/19/04); and he supported effective informed consent for abortion (HB 1340, 3/17/04; HB 399, 3/9/05). In 2001, he voted to abolish New Hampshire’s death penalty (HB 171, 4/5/01; the bill failed by fewer than 10 votes).

District 2 is an open seat, with incumbent Jeanie Forrester now running for Governor.

District 8: There is a Republican primary between Jim Beard and Ruth Ward, neither of whom has a State House voting record. Neither candidate’s web site mentions any stand on the right to life. District 8 is an open seat, as former Senator Jerry Little has been appointed New Hampshire’s Banking Commissioner.

Jim Adams, Exec Council candidate: life is “the most important gift we have”

NH Executive Council candidate Jim Adams in 2016
Jim Adams, candidate for Executive Council district 4. Photo by Ellen Kolb.

While at the State House waiting for the recent Executive Council meeting to begin, I met Jim Adams. He’s running in the Republican primary for Executive Council district 4, in hopes of taking the seat away from incumbent Chris Pappas. Our chat didn’t rise to the level of a formal interview, but he said something to me that I thought was worth taking down.

When I was in Vietnam, I was a hospital corpsman, eighteen years old. I dealt with the human wreckage of war. I had no opinions [on] pro-life; that was not as prominent as it is today.

I had a  young Marine who was badly injured. It was easy for me to see he was not going to make it. He grabbed my left arm and held onto it so tight I could barely get started [assisting him]. I was doing everything I could. You have to keep them focused, because if they don’t look in your eyes, they see how bad it is, they go into shock. He’s wanting his mother; all the things people think happen at that time, most of it does. He was hanging on to his life with every fiber in his being. And he slowly started to let go of my hand. He was not going to make it.

At eighteen years old, when I saw how hard that young man was trying to hang on to his life with every fiber in his being, I saw that life is the most important gift we have, and one should never be taken as a matter of convenience.

That’s one way to start a conversation about the life issues. Mr. Adams’s web site, under the heading “Fight for Your Family”, mentions his opposition to using funds to “support abortion.” I encourage district 4 voters to pursue specifics with Mr. Adams and with his GOP primary challenger, Joe Kelly Levasseur.

On the Democratic side, incumbent Pappas is unopposed. Pappas has voted twice in Council for public funding for abortion providers.

(District 4 includes the city of Manchester and the towns of Allenstown, Auburn, Barrington, Bedford, Bow, Candia, Chichester, Deerfield, Epsom, Goffstown, Hooksett, Lee, Londonderry, Loudon, Northwood, Nottingham, Pembroke, and Pittsfield.)